Rubbers for a blocker

Table Tennis Equipment

Last updated 6 years ago

Johnny Long

Johnny Long Asked 6 years ago

Hey,

I'm a blocker, and I'm not sure what kind of rubber I should use of blocking.

Right now I'm using quite fast inverted rubber on both sides.

People have told me to use much slower rubber, short pimples etc, and I just have no idea.

Thanks. 


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario Answered 6 years ago

Hi Johnny,

You could use a slow rubber to make it easier for blocking.  I don’t have any specific rubber to recommend, but others may be able to help.


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Thoughts on this question

Johnny Long

Johnny Long Posted 6 years ago

Thanks for the response Alois. Would you recommend short pimples for a beginner like me?


Alois Rosario

Alois Rosario from PingSkills Posted 6 years ago

Not at this stage.  Maybe later short pimples is an option.


Mike Deubig

Mike Deubig Posted 6 years ago

I have a suggestion, I also recommended this rubber to my cousin who is mainly a control player (1100 to 1200 rated player) and he has played with this rubber. I recommend the TIBHAR Aurus Soft rubber with a 2.1 sponge on both sides. 


Jean Balthazar

Jean Balthazar Posted 6 years ago

Aurus Soft is still a rather fast rubber (I used Aurus Sound for a while, which is the same with an even softer sponge). It's also quite springy, which is not what you're typically looking for when you're focussing on blocks.

For blocks, a hard sponge helps. But hard sponged rubbers are usually rather fast. So hard and slow... Mark V ? (but itsrubber is soft and very gripy, so maybe not the easiest to control for blocking spinny top/sidespins).

The bat has an influence too. To optimize blocks, it should be rather stiff (and slow).


Mike Deubig

Mike Deubig Posted 6 years ago

Use a thinner sponge, which will make it less "springy" if your very defensive...I recommended the 2.1, so the ball grips better for those selected offensive moves. Rubber with soft sponges is the way to go because it has better control. Stiff means more speed because stiffness creates more spring. I agree the blade will play a factor, make sure it's a defensive blade. As you get better, you learn how to control the ball more. 


Johnny Long

Johnny Long Posted 6 years ago

Thanks for the suggestions and help Mike and Jean. 


Jean Balthazar

Jean Balthazar Posted 6 years ago

There's pros and cons. It is indeed easier to find slow rubbers with soft sponges, and they will do the trick on blocks in terms of incoming speed reduction, but the harder sponged rubbers will be more precise in terms of ball placement.

I see the difference between my forehand 2mm Vega Pro (47.5° sponge) and my backhand 1.8mm Vega Europe (42,5° sponge): the Pro is faster, still it is easier to use on blocks. It's not like day and night, and the Europe is still very usable, but there's a noticeable difference. I thought I needed the slower and more controlled backhand, but I tried to turn my bat several times, and the Pro feels better in almost every aspect, except for slow topspins and for its weight (bought a lighter blade to compensate, hope it won't be too nose-heavy).

I'm with you on the thinner sponge idea.

Anyway, good luck Johnny! Let us know what you picked in the end and how it worked out for you.



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